Online Art Amazes People Amid The Pandemic

Viewing+art+exhibits+has+become+a+challenge+due+to+COVID-19+safety+precautions.+Artists+Sam+Lavigne+and+Tega+Brain+created+an+online+exhibit+revolving+around+this+very+topic.+

Photo by Getty Images

Viewing art exhibits has become a challenge due to COVID-19 safety precautions. Artists Sam Lavigne and Tega Brain created an online exhibit revolving around this very topic.

In the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic, thousands of businesses have shut down, including art museums. Online art galleries have been a saving grace to those who cannot go a day without seeing their favorite art pieces in museums. For these art enthusiasts, world-renown artists like Sam Lavigne and Tega Brain have come to their rescue. 

Brain is an Australian born artist and environmental engineer while Lavigne is an artist and educator based in New York. Together they have created the ultimate online piece of art. One that consists of thousands of compassionate and caring texts, messages and comments that have been circulated throughout GoFundMe pages.

Lavigne and Brain created an online art piece called, “Get Well Soon.” This piece consists of texts from the Internet compiled into an online journal that is presented horizontally and vertically. 

They’ve been compiled into a piece of digital artwork called, ‘Get Well Soon,’” according to New York Times reporter Sophie Haigney. “It was intended to speak to the strange ecosystem of online crowdfunding that has ballooned as hundreds of thousands of Americans have simultaneously become sick from the coronavirus and lost their health care, along with their jobs.” 

In a time of need, this awe-inspiring digital compilation has both comforted and provided hope, while leaving viewers in complete amazement as they scroll through countless supportive notes left in the cyber world. 

“Yet despite this, the archive that comprises Get Well Soon… is effusive,” as said by Taylor Estape from Miami New Times. “Reading through the endless scroll of well-wishes, it’s easy to feel the warmth of care and to imagine avalanches of support flooding the needy.”

 Lavigne and Brain have created something that can be close to many people’s hearts.  

“Hosted online by Miami-based gallery Dimensions Variable, Get Well Soon is a digital artwork composed of 200,000 messages of well wishes from crowdfunding campaigns on the site gofundme.com,” as referenced in Burnaway by Leia Genis. “Presenting these messages alphabetically in a series of scrollable columns across a webpage.” 

These kind notes may not seem as big of a deal individually, but when they are compiled, they show strength, hope and compassion, just as the artists intended them to.